The product has been added to your basket

period-tool-header-header-NEW-2period-tool-header-header-NEW-2period-tool-header-header-NEW-2

Quiz

What’s your period IQ?

Find out by taking our ‘womb 101’ quiz – and pick up some facts about the menstrual cycle along the way. Knowledge is power!

D

o you find yourself blushing when someone drops the ‘P-word’ or tells you when they’re due to come on? You’re not alone – research indicates that half of women shy away from talking about their periods. But with girls missing school because of theirs, and adults still embarrassed to go to the doctor with ‘women’s problems,’ it’s time to stop thinking of our cycles as taboo. Let’s get talking!

<Back

Step1/6

How long is the average menstrual cycle?

  • A.7 days

  • B.10 days

  • C.28 days

CORRECT!

 

The average menstrual cycle is 28 days

The menstrual cycle is an all-encompassing phrase for menstruation and ovulation. From start to finish, here’s what happens… Day one is the first day of menstruation (aka your period), and most people bleed for between three and seven days. Between days 12 and 18 – though this can vary – ovulation occurs: an egg is released from the ovaries and moves through the fallopian tubes to the womb, where it hopes to meet sperm (hello, fertilisation!). Meanwhile, your uterine (womb) lining is thickening (thanks to a rise in progesterone levels), in order to make a ‘good home’ for a fertilised egg. But if pregnancy doesn’t happen, progesterone levels drop and the thickened uterine lining breaks down and travels down the vagina – this is your period. Then the whole cycle starts again!

 

WRONG

 

The average menstrual cycle is 28 days

The menstrual cycle is an all-encompassing phrase for menstruation and ovulation. From start to finish, here’s what happens… Day one is the first day of menstruation (aka your period), and most people bleed for between three and seven days. Between days 12 and 18 – though this can vary – ovulation occurs: an egg is released from the ovaries and moves through the fallopian tubes to the womb, where it hopes to meet sperm (hello, fertilisation!). Meanwhile, your uterine (womb) lining is thickening (thanks to a rise in progesterone levels), in order to make a ‘good home’ for a fertilised egg. But if pregnancy doesn’t happen, progesterone levels drop and the thickened uterine lining breaks down and travels down the vagina – this is your period. Then the whole cycle starts again!

What does PMS stand for?

  • A.Premenstrual mood swings

  • B.Premenstrual stress

  • C.Premenstrual syndrome

CORRECT!

 

PMS stands for premenstrual syndrome

Premenstrual syndrome affects some women before and during their period. Symptoms vary, but can include mood swings, bloating, breast pain, fatigue, and feeling irritable or emotional. Sound familiar? The exact cause of PMS is actually still unknown (come on, science!), but it’s thought to be tied to changes in hormones and chemicals in the brain during menstruation.

WRONG

 

PMS stands for premenstrual syndrome

Premenstrual syndrome affects some women before and during their period. Symptoms vary, but can include mood swings, bloating, breast pain, fatigue, and feeling irritable or emotional. Sound familiar? The exact cause of PMS is actually still unknown (come on, science!), but it’s thought to be tied to changes in hormones and chemicals in the brain during menstruation.

What’s the average age for a girl to start her period?

  • A.16 years old

  • B.12 years old

  • C.14 years old

CORRECT!

 

The average girl in the UK starts her period when she’s 12

A hundred years ago, the average age of a girl in the UK to have her first period was 16. Now, it’s around 12 years old, but puberty can start as early as eight. Why? It’s thought it could be due to dietary and lifestyle influences, such as being overweight and the chemicals in our environments. So if you have kids, make sure you’re talking to them (yep, boys, too), so they’re clued up from a young age. You could even get them to do this quiz to get the conversation started!

WRONG

 

The average girl in the UK starts her period when she’s 12

A hundred years ago, the average age of a girl in the UK to have her first period was 16. Now, it’s around 12 years old, but puberty can start as early as eight. Why? It’s thought it could be due to dietary and lifestyle influences, such as being overweight and the chemicals in our environments. So if you have kids, make sure you’re talking to them (yep, boys, too), so they’re clued up from a young age. You could even get them to do this quiz to get the conversation started!

How much blood is lost during a period?

  • A.3-5 tablespoons

  • B.9-11 tablespoons

  • C.6-8 tablespoons

CORRECT!

 

On average, about 3-5 tablespoons

It may sometimes seem like you’re losing a lot of blood, yet if you measured it (maybe don’t try this at home!), it would only fill about a quarter of a cup. But how do you know if the amount you’re losing isn’t normal? Well, experiencing ‘flooding’ (heavy bleeding) that can sometimes leak through to clothes or bedding, or needing to use tampons and towels together, are indicators of heavier periods. It doesn’t necessarily mean there’s anything wrong, but it can affect you physically and emotionally. So, speak to your GP if this happens regularly, or there is a change in your flow, to rule out conditions such as fibroids, endometriosis and polycystic ovary syndrome

WRONG

 

On average, about 3-5 tablespoons

It may sometimes seem like you’re losing a lot of blood, yet if you measured it (maybe don’t try this at home!), it would only fill about a quarter of a cup. But how do you know if the amount you’re losing isn’t normal? Well, experiencing ‘flooding’ (heavy bleeding) that can sometimes leak through to clothes or bedding, or needing to use tampons and towels together, are indicators of heavier periods. It doesn’t necessarily mean there’s anything wrong, but it can affect you physically and emotionally. So, speak to your GP if this happens regularly, or there is a change in your flow, to rule out conditions such as fibroids, endometriosis and polycystic ovary syndrome

Period cramps are caused by...

  • A.Progestorone

  • B.Prostaglandins

  • C.Oestrogen

CORRECT!

 

Cramps are caused by chemicals called prostaglandins

Prostaglandis are often released when you’re having your period to encourage the womb muscles to contract and help shed the uterine lining – and these contractions increased the level of pain experienced. You can ease the pain by taking an anti-inflammatory, such as ibuprofen – this blocks the production of more prostaglandins. If your cramps are severe and you have tried taking painkillers, and you’re still in a lot of pain every month, don’t suffer in silence – see your doctor to get it checked out.

WRONG

 

Cramps are caused by chemicals called prostaglandins

Prostaglandis are often released when you’re having your period to encourage the womb muscles to contract and help shed the uterine lining – and these contractions increased the level of pain experienced. You can ease the pain by taking an anti-inflammatory, such as ibuprofen – this blocks the production of more prostaglandins. If your cramps are severe and you have tried taking painkillers, and you’re still in a lot of pain every month, don’t suffer in silence – see your doctor to get it checked out.

The average age for women to go through the menopause is...

  • A.49

  • B.51

  • C.55

CORRECT!

 

In the UK, the average age for a woman to reach the menopause is 51

The menopause usually happens between the ages of 45 and 55, as a woman’s oestrogen levels fall. However, around one woman in 100 experiences the menopause before 40 years of age (known as premature menopause). Symptoms can begin months or even years before your periods stop, and can last about four years after your final period. You’re likely to notice symptoms such as hot flushes, vaginal dryness, problems sleeping, low mood or anxiety, reduced sex drive and issues with memory and concentration. Your GP can offer treatments and suggest lifestyle changes if you have severe symptoms that interfere with your daily life. Want to know your predicted menopause age? Find out what your mum’s was, as it is often strongly linked to genetics.

WRONG

 

In the UK, the average age for a woman to reach the menopause is 51

The menopause usually happens between the ages of 45 and 55, as a woman’s oestrogen levels fall. However, around one woman in 100 experiences the menopause before 40 years of age (known as premature menopause). Symptoms can begin months or even years before your periods stop, and can last about four years after your final period. You’re likely to notice symptoms such as hot flushes, vaginal dryness, problems sleeping, low mood or anxiety, reduced sex drive and issues with memory and concentration. Your GP can offer treatments and suggest lifestyle changes if you have severe symptoms that interfere with your daily life. Want to know your predicted menopause age? Find out what your mum’s was, as it is often strongly linked to genetics.

What can worsen the symptoms of PMS?

  • A.Not getting enough daylight

  • B.Heavy periods

  • C.Poor diet, daily stresses and being overweight

CORRECT!

 

Yep, being overweight and feeling stressed may contribute to PMS

Suffering with PMS? Your first steps should be improving your diet, upping your fitness levels where you can, learning relaxation techniques and getting regular sleep. You should see your GP if you’re finding it difficult to deal with the symptoms, or if your symptoms are severe. They can help determine if you have PMDD (premenstrual dysphoric disorder) – it’s relatively common, and thought to affect 1 in 20 women. They may be able to offer you advice to help manage your symptoms.

WRONG

 

Being overweight and feeling stressed may contribute to PMS

Suffering with PMS? Your first steps should be improving your diet, upping your fitness levels where you can, learning relaxation techniques and getting regular sleep. You should see your GP if you’re finding it difficult to deal with the symptoms, or if your symptoms are severe. They can help determine if you have PMDD (premenstrual dysphoric disorder) – it’s relatively common, and thought to affect 1 in 20 women. They may be able to offer you advice to help manage your symptoms.

You only got 1 or 2 right…

…you could do with swotting up on menstruation

 

Oh dear! You might need to go back to period school… Learning how your body works will arm you with knowledge about what’s considered normal for you, and it might help you pick up on any problems with your cycle in the future.

You got 3-5 right…

…you know the menstruation basics

 

You’ve a fair understanding of menstruation, but this quiz definitely had you scratching your head at times. Keep up the good work — if you continue upping your menstrual knowledge, you might even become a period genius.

Well done! You nearly got them all right…

…you’re a period genius

 

Congrats – you know your flow! Just remember to never stop learning about your body, and always have the confidence to speak up about abnormalities in your cycle.

Ways Boots can help

Most of our Boots pharmacies have a private consultation room where you can speak in private with one of our phamacists about health queries or concerns you may have.

Big holiday, special occasion or going travelling? It’s good to know the Boots Period Delay Online Clinic* can help give you access to a service that may help meet your needs, visit boots.com/perioddelay.

If you have any concerns about clotting or an irregular cycle, see your GP.

F

ace feeling tight and dry? The new Simple Water Boost Hydrating Booster, £6.99 (25ml), could be the answer. This lightweight gel can be used as a primer before moisturising, a booster added to your moisturiser, or a treatment applied to dry areas. The result? Lasting hydration that helps skin look dewy-fresh. For a chance to win a pamper hamper worth £200, go here

Words Charlotte Grant-West Photography Getty Images
close

Rate us

Enjoying this issue?
Let us know what you think

Please click on a star

Poor
Great